Archive for September, 2008

Stress – How to Cope Part 2

September 26th, 2008

Table of contents for Stress

  1. Stress – Its Effects on Your Health
  2. Stress – How to Cope
  3. Stress – How to Cope Part 2

Implementing these 6 daily habits will empower you to better cope with stress.

This is Part 2 of steps for coping with stress. Please read the first 5 steps for coping with stress if you missed them by clicking on the link at the beginning of this post. These steps on how to alleviate stress are condensed from Dr. Don Colbert’s book, “The Seven Pillars of Health.”

Guard Your Mental Intake: What enters into your mind affects your health. Many people begin their day listening to national or world news, soap operas, gossipy morning talk shows, or music with negative lyrics. If your day begins by filling your mind with worries about the economy or other people’s problems and/or dysfunctions, you are bound to be stressed before you even get to work! Wisdom from Prov. 4:23, “Above all else, guard your heart, for out of it spring the issues of life.” What you put into your internal being affects every issue of your life. Does your intake create strength and healing? If not, change to positive input.

Breathe Correctly: Proper breathing is one of the best de-stressing techniques and usually the least used. Dr. Colbert tells of asking a paramedic friend what made the different between a trauma patient living or dying. He answered, “I have seen others with significantly less severe injuries die because they simply quit breathing.” Though we are born breathing correctly, abdominal breathing, most of us end up chest and shoulder breathing using short breaths. Our abdomen should rise and fall when we breathe, not our chest and/or shoulders. Abdominal breathing has a calming effect on the brain and nervous system as well as relieving pain, stress, and muscle tension. Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Dementia and Vitamin B-12 Deficiency

September 24th, 2008

Reading Level: Leisurely

Various studies have been done linking both average and low Vitamin B-12 levels to brain shrinkage and dementia.

I came across 3 different studies regarding B-12 deficiency and memory problems. I’ll paste abbreviated results below with their references in case you want to read the full articles. Top sources of Vitamin B are listed at the end of the post.

Take note of these main points:

-Though western cultures normally eat enough food with B-12, the absorption of it decreases with age.

-The push for using antacids has also decreased people’s absorption of B-12.

-If you divide a normal range of B-12 absorption into thirds, the elderly people in the lower level of what is still considered normal B-12 blood level range had 6 times more brain shrinkage than those in the upper third. Thus, a normal level could still be risky unless you are at the higher end of the range. Two studies below showed risk in normal ranges.

-Dairy products, fish, and meat are the typical sources of B-12.

-Daily oral doses of B-12 in 1000 mcg were effective in raising B-12 levels in elderly and reducing memory problems.

-Vitamin B-12 helps in the formation of red blood cells and is important for the maintenance of the central nervous system. Deficiency can lead to anemia and neurological damage.

-Vitamin B-12 deficiency is uncommon in developed countries but is an issue among the elderly due to problems in vitamin absorption and among vegetarians whose dietary intake may be low, the researchers said.

Study 1

In the study led by David Smith and Anna Vogiatzoglou of the University of Oxford in Britain, people in the upper third of vitamin Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Stress – How to Cope

September 23rd, 2008

Table of contents for Stress

  1. Stress – Its Effects on Your Health
  2. Stress – How to Cope
  3. Stress – How to Cope Part 2

To avoid living in a constant state of stress and the resulting physical consequences, implement some daily habits to better cope with stress.

These steps on how to alleviate stress come from Dr. Don Colbert’s book, “The Seven Pillars of Health.” If you missed the information on the physical reactions to living life in a repeated state of stress, please read Part 1, “Stress – Its Effects on Your Health,” by clicking this link here or the one at the top of this post.

Practice Mindfulness: This is the concept of letting go of any thought that is unrelated to the present moment and finding something to enjoy in the present moment. Most people do not live well in the present moment; they are always wishing for a different moment in the past when things were happier or simpler, or wishing for a moment in the future when they think they can be happy, such as by getting a promotion, getting out of debt, or buying a new house. Find something enjoyable to focus on in the immediate moment all throughout the day, such as the warmth of the sun, the breeze, music. During breaks at work, don’t think about goals or projects; enjoy your cup of coffee or a magazine. If a stressful thought comes to mind, choose to move on to a thought that is related to what you are presently seeing, hearing, smelling, or feeling that is pleasant. Instead of complaining about what you don’t have, be grateful for what you do have, air conditioning in your house or a car to get to work. Dr. Colbert suggests that his patients go for a walk or go to the zoo to practice focusing on all that can be enjoyed in a moment. “To have complete mental and physical health, mindfulness must become a way of life, a continual pattern for practicing relaxation during your day (p.236).”

Reframe Your Perspectives: Reframing is learning to see the past, present, and future in a positive light by shifting from one’s present point of view Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Stress – Its Effects on Your Health

September 19th, 2008

Table of contents for Stress

  1. Stress – Its Effects on Your Health
  2. Stress – How to Cope
  3. Stress – How to Cope Part 2

Reading Level: Leisurely

Some of us go through life in an almost constant state of stress.

Evaluate how often in your daily routine do you allow a variety of little events to trigger stress, such as driving in traffic, a wrongly-filled order at the drive-thru, or a needed call to customer service to resolve a billing problem. The research in these next 2 posts covering the effects of stress and how to better cope come from Dr. Don Colbert’s book, “The Seven Pillars of Health.” In his initial chapter on stress, he says, “The stress reaction, so useful in moments of actual emergency, becomes a self-destruct switch that eventually can lead to exhaustion and disease (p. 229). “

The body’s response to stress is necessary and healthy when occurring in traumatic moments. When one allows typical daily events to create a recurring traumatic response in your body, the intended healthy physical responses become harmful.

The body’s stress reaction to a perceived threat releases adrenaline and other hormones that increase your blood pressure, heart rate, breathing. These changes give you added strength and mental sharpness for a few moments. The harm comes to us when this response occurs frequently for a long-term basis. Researchers now believe that such recurrent stress actually kills as many or even more people than poor health habits. Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Visualize & Speak Health and Restoration into Existence

September 18th, 2008

Table of contents for Speaking Health and Restoration into Existence

  1. Speaking Health and Restoration into Existence
  2. Visualize & Speak Health and Restoration into Existence

Some simple daily exercises for health and restoration are beneficial in the realization of your goals.

After talking with a loved one who was going through a breakdown of the family structure, finances, and emotional state, I began to visualize seeing him as he desires his life to be–happy, healthy, trim, and successful. When one’s dreams for his or her life have come crashing down around them, it is rather difficult, and seemingly absurd to visualize one’s self and life in a state of near perfection. However, in recent years I have been studying people in both the secular world and religious world who have used the principle of faith to bring restoration after every aspect of their lives had been completely destroyed, and all of them say, “You must see where you want to be in your mind; you must visualize it for it to come to pass.” As a main key to being successful is learning how others achieved it, the concepts of visualizing and speaking restoration into existence should be taken hold of by anyone in need of life restoration.

Let’s look at two daily exercises to evoke health and life restoration. Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Crisis Management – The Means to Long Life

September 17th, 2008

Reading Level: Leisurely

How you deal with crises or tragedies affect the length of your life as well as the daily quality.

I once heard a report on the news about a study done with people over 100 years of age. They were expecting to discover a common health link, something those seniors did or did not eat, or some type of exercise routine. Much to the astonishment of those doing the study, there did not appear to be any common denominators in health habits. Obviously, health habits will affect the quality of one’s physical life, especially as you get older. However, the sole common denominator in these seniors who lived to be over 100 years of age was how they dealt with crises or tragedies; they had a commitment to move forward or move past the tragedy and continue to find enjoyment in life. In their view, it was worth living just to be alive, regardless of the events they experienced.

A perspective that sees value solely in being alive will benefit one’s daily life as well.

Though it wasn’t discussed in the part of the report I heard, I would imagine that people who outlived their peers due to a commitment to move beyond tragedy had also lived their daily lives with the same perspective-“This too shall pass,” “Life goes on…,” or whatever applicable saying you have heard. If one has a view to be able to enjoy life just because he or she is still alive, regardless of even facing tragedies, imagine how much less Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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When is Pain Good?

September 16th, 2008

Reading Level: Impassioned

In the physical health world, the phrase “No pain, no gain,” is quite familiar. When it comes to emotional health in relationships and boundary setting, “No pain, no gain” is also an applicable phrase.

People who repeatedly allow themselves to be hurt or harmed by others, physically or emotionally, have difficulty setting boundaries. They bring a continual flow of destruction into their lives due to not setting boundaries, or not making clear what is acceptable and what is not acceptable behavior mainly due to a fear of the other person’s response. They fear the other person’s anger or they even fear hurting the other person’s feelings. Often, the boundaryless person fears hurting the other person because of an “over-identification with loss.” He hasn’t dealt with his own personal losses, especially those caused by the harmful relationship, so he has an unrealistic, over-emotional response to the thought of hurting the other person. It is a tragic thing to see destruction rule throughout a person’s whole life when restoration and abundance is attainable-all because he or she fears boundary setting will hurt the other person’s feelings. In such cases, pain is a good thing!

First, realize that it is possible to hurt someone’s feelings by “doing what needs to be done” and being responsible with your gift of life.

Those who follow this blog know that I frequently refer to the Boundaries book by Cloud and Townsend when discussing relationship issues of this type. You do what you need to do though it may hurt the other person’s feelings. This is not a matter of being inconsiderate. You think through and evaluate how the boundary will likely hurt the other person’s feelings; that’s being empathetic and “taking into account” the other person’s feelings. But you still set the boundaries to stop the harm to your life; otherwise, you are being irresponsible to the gift of your own life. The other person will likely insult you, saying that you are cruel or unforgiving. To purposely hurt someone’s feelings without giving any consideration to the fact that the person will hurt would be wrong (Keep in mind this is exactly what the other person is doing to you when violating your boundaries.), but so is not setting the boundaries necessary so that you can fulfill your God-given destiny with the precious gift of your own life!

In boundary setting, we must recognize the clear difference between hurt and harm.

Here is the most wonderfully wise example provided by Cloud and Townsend, pp. 93-94, of the difference between hurt and harm. Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Character – Key to Success in Life

September 11th, 2008

Reading Level: Leisurely

Rarely do we contemplate that the key to one’s success in life is a matter of re-constructing our personalities or character to reflect the nature of the Creator.

How are all great works of art recognized? They bear the distinct, unique characteristics of the artist, of the creator. It is also these characteristics of the artist that give the work of art its value. Similarly, we were created to live bearing the unique characteristics of our Creator, of His divine nature. It is these same characteristics that increase the value of our person and enhance our ability to succeed in life.

Consider this daily life example. It is a common principle that the more admirable qualities which exist in a person, the more they are esteemed by society. For example, people desire to enter into business contracts with someone they know is trustworthy. People want to shop at stores with efficient and helpful customer service. We were created to live embodying the very character of God in our own natures or personalities — characteristics which are highly regarded and therefore, increase our “value” in the eyes of society. Just as a piece of art carries out the purpose it was created, as we live life emanating the character of God, we will see greater success because we are living according to our divine purpose; we are like a piece of fine art, bearing the characteristics of the artist!

What type of characteristics should one focus on to incorporate the divine nature into his own nature and increase his success in life? Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Healing Words Part 2

September 9th, 2008

Table of contents for Healing Words

  1. Healing Words
  2. Healing Words Part 2

Reading Level: Leisurely

Recent events in the US Open were a good illustration of the harm that quickly comes to people on both ends of a conversation through a careless moment with one’s words.

It made headlines the last few days of the US Open (tennis) when a few careless words in an attempt to joke brought great offense to another athlete, visibly hindering his play in the quarters and semifinals. We began following the sport a few years ago when we watched Wimbledon with a visiting friend. Commentators mentioned that medical staff for the players avoid giving many details on injuries; this seems logical as it would give an advantage to the opponent. When Andy Roddick was asked in an interview about his strategy for an upcoming match with Novak Djokovic’, he made a careless remark implying that Djokokvic’ had so many injuries that he would be easy to beat. We, ourselves, were startled at the words, as one of the things we’ve appreciated about the sport is an apparent higher level of conduct than in most sports; in pre and post games interviews that we’ve seen, it is standard that the athletes always compliment their opponents. Though Roddick later stated that the remark was only a joke, the offense soon made international headline news.

Most of us are fortunate enough that are words are not publicized by the press, but the results of such a remark paint a clear portrait for us. It was an opportunity in which immense character could have been displayed by the offender.

Djokovic’ and his family were deeply offended by the remark and his normal, fighting spirit was no where to be found in his last match of the Open; one could see a visible oppression on his spirit. We all fail, at times, with our words. Scripture says that, otherwise, we would be perfect people–meaning if we were so disciplined as to perfectly control our words, we would be perfect in all other areas of our lives as well. Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Healing Words

September 5th, 2008

Table of contents for Healing Words

  1. Healing Words
  2. Healing Words Part 2

Reading Level: Leisurely

As each word that you speak affects every nerve in your body, your commitment to health and healing needs to begin with your words.

Most of us, more often than not, are not too concerned about the proportion of careless words, as opposed to well-thought out words, that come out of our mouths. We have all heard motivational speakers refer to our need to speak positively of our present and future, but here is some science to back it up.

The brain has a specific lobe for speech. The nerves in our brain link to the rest of our bodies in an incredibly extensive way. C. John Holcombe, in his article on Brain Functioning, describes it this way:

Though the greatest mass of nerve cells is collected in the brain, the nervous system links all parts of the body, in a most intimate way, the nerve cells ramifying into and connecting the cells in the bone, skin, organs of digestion, perception, respiration, etc. (1)

So the nerves in our brain connect to the cells in our skin, bones, organs, etc. Though you speak words with your mouth, the nerves in your brain send responses throughout the all the cells of your body. Yomi Akinpelu has a thorough discussion of it in his book, “A Matter of Life and Death.” Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Rejection to Self Esteem Building

September 3rd, 2008

Reading Level: Gratifying

Rejection comes to each of us, but we can take steps to heal and move forward with the productive life we deserve and desire.

Many readers have asked for help in dealing with rejection from parents and other relationships. Whether rejection comes from a family member, friend, co-worker, or even a mere stranger, it leaves us with a wide variety of emotions, such as pain and guilt, and questions as to why would someone feel that way about us. Let’s cover several steps that help us to heal and move forward to a happier life.

First, don’t spend a great deal of time questioning why.

Unless the person broke the relationship due to a major personality flaw on your part which they directly communicated to you as the cause of the rejection–and you already know you need to work on that aspect–quit questioning why. If there was no such communication on the offender’s part, speculation will not help you for the following reason. If the cause was a personality flaw on your part and they were not willing to communicate in such as way as to allow for healing and reconciliation in the relationship, the offender is not presently, and may never be, in a mental/emotional state to have a long-term, healthy relationship. As it is, it is much more likely, since they were unwilling to communicate in a way as to provide for reconciliation, that the major emotional issues are on their part.

Second, quit being too hard on yourself.

If you are aware of certain mistakes you made that contributed to the rejection, you can always work on changing those behaviors, even getting profession help if needed. However, you must be realistic in accessing your failures. Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Hypothyroidism and Natural Cures

September 2nd, 2008

Reading Level: Gratifying

Over 45 million people suffer from vague symptoms that they think are a normal part of life and are actually caused by subclinical hypothyroidism, a condition that goes undiagnosed in half the people who have it. (1)

Symptoms such as chronic fatigue, feeling sluggish in the morning, and memory or concentration difficulties are common symptoms of subclinical hypothyroidism. Obviously, these symptoms can occur from other deficiencies as well, but this statement from Dr. Mark Hyman, M.D. of UltraWellness explains why it is such a commonly undiagnosed problem:

Subclinical hypothyroidism may trigger many low-grade symptoms, such as chronic fatigue, trouble losing weight, mild depression, constipation, and more, yet it causes just slight changes in your blood tests. In fact, it often only shows up in tests that most conventional medical doctors never perform, leaving most people to accept the symptoms as a normal part of their lives. (1)

The purpose of this article is not to cause panic or unnecessary concern, but I am living proof of such a situation, with my under active thyroid and lack of iodine absorption never being diagnosed until in my 40’s. After researching the subject, in retrospect, many of the symptoms (more than listed here) I have had my entire life. My kinesiologist was the first doctor to make any improvements in this area.

I recently came across an article about coconut oil as a possible nature help for hypothyroidism.

There are doctors on both sides of this issue, Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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