Dementia Linked to Vitamin B-12 Deficiency

April 9th, 2013

Various studies have been done linking both average and low Vitamin B-12 levels to brain shrinkage and dementia.

We covered several beneficial practices in the post on Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention, so I thought it would be good to follow it up with these results of 3 different studies regarding B-12 deficiency and memory problems. I’ll paste abbreviated results below with their references so you can read the full articles. Top sources of Vitamin B are listed at the end of the post.

Take note of these main points:

-Though western cultures normally eat enough food with B-12, the absorption of it decreases with age.

-The push for using antacids has also decreased people’s absorption of B-12.

-If you divide a normal range of B-12 absorption into thirds, the elderly people in the lower level of what is still considered normal B-12 blood level range had 6 times more brain shrinkage than those in the upper third. Thus, a normal level could still be risky unless you are at the higher end of the range. Two studies below showed risk in normal ranges.

-Dairy products, fish, and meat are the typical sources of B-12.

-Daily oral doses of B-12 in 1000 mcg were effective in raising B-12 levels in elderly and reducing memory problems. Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Memory Loss: Disease or Normal Aging?

October 31st, 2012

Reading Level: Leisurely

Those of us dealing with our own aging or that of aging parents often wonder which symptoms are normal memory loss and which signal Alzheimer’s.

The Alzheimer’s Association has developed a practical chart comparing which symptoms of memory loss are normal and which should cause concern of a serious illness. People used to believe that memory loss was a normal part of aging, even the severe symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s. Experts have since discovered that severe memory loss is a sign of serious illness.

Dementia is a general term for loss of memory while Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, accounting for 50 to 70 percent of cases. The national website for the Alzheimer’s Association has a great deal of helpful information for those who want to study more details than listed below.

Here are excerpts of the 10 comparative symptoms of memory loss.

For the full article, see the Alzheimer’s Associations Warning Signs page. It should be noted that not everyone will experience the same symptoms or progress at the same rate. If you are worried about memory changes in yourself or a loved one, you can call Alz.org with your questions 1.866.ALZ.4199.

1. Memory Loss

Normal – Forgetting names or appointments occasionally.
Warning Sign – Forgetting recently learned information is one of the most common early signs.

2. Difficulty performing familiar tasks

Normal – Occasionally forgetting why you entered a room or what you were going to say.
Warning Sign – Hard to plan or complete everyday tasks. Lose track of the steps involved in preparing a meal, placing a telephone call or playing a game. Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention

October 27th, 2012

As over 5 million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s and over 500,000 of them are under the age of 65, it is well worth looking into preventative measures.

I’m highlighting 10 points from an AOL article by Vicki Salemi with a link below to the full article. The sentences in parentheses are my comments on some of the points. The doctor in Ms. Salemi’s article does recommend certain drugs as preventative measures; we, personally, prefer non-drug methods as much as possible, as all drugs have some negative side effects which can outweigh any benefits.

Vitamin B Work with your doctor to put together a plan to incorporate whatever vitamins you are deficient in, particularly Vitamin B. [Our doctor said that Vitamin B is the most difficult vitamin for the body to absorb, so he suggests a quality B complex even if it is the only vitamin you take.]

Heart Healthy Foods Implement a heart healthy diet that’s low in fat and high in fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

Mental Gymnastics Taking your brain out of the comfort zone is one way to make connections and remain stimulated, such as doing crossword puzzles, creates a multi-dimensional connection.

Exercise Thirty minutes of exercise several times a week is beneficial for brain health. Exercise brings more oxygen to your brain, it helps burn excess sugar, it enhances hormones and is good for blood flow.

Avoid Heavy Metal Contamination Avoid shrimp and shellfish due to the mercury. Avoid exposure to aluminum in general, aluminum foil, pots and pans or deodorant with aluminum as an ingredient. [When buying fish, we look for “wild caught” on the label, and albacore in tuna, as they are supposed to be lower in heavy metals, though some doctors avoid fish completely, such as Dr. Mercola.] Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Dementia and Vitamin B-12 Deficiency

September 24th, 2008

Reading Level: Leisurely

Various studies have been done linking both average and low Vitamin B-12 levels to brain shrinkage and dementia.

I came across 3 different studies regarding B-12 deficiency and memory problems. I’ll paste abbreviated results below with their references in case you want to read the full articles. Top sources of Vitamin B are listed at the end of the post.

Take note of these main points:

-Though western cultures normally eat enough food with B-12, the absorption of it decreases with age.

-The push for using antacids has also decreased people’s absorption of B-12.

-If you divide a normal range of B-12 absorption into thirds, the elderly people in the lower level of what is still considered normal B-12 blood level range had 6 times more brain shrinkage than those in the upper third. Thus, a normal level could still be risky unless you are at the higher end of the range. Two studies below showed risk in normal ranges.

-Dairy products, fish, and meat are the typical sources of B-12.

-Daily oral doses of B-12 in 1000 mcg were effective in raising B-12 levels in elderly and reducing memory problems.

-Vitamin B-12 helps in the formation of red blood cells and is important for the maintenance of the central nervous system. Deficiency can lead to anemia and neurological damage.

-Vitamin B-12 deficiency is uncommon in developed countries but is an issue among the elderly due to problems in vitamin absorption and among vegetarians whose dietary intake may be low, the researchers said.

Study 1

In the study led by David Smith and Anna Vogiatzoglou of the University of Oxford in Britain, people in the upper third of vitamin Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention

August 15th, 2008

Reading Level: Leisurely

As over 5 million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s and over 500,000 of them are under the age of 65, it is well worth looking into preventative measures.

I’m highlighting 10 points from an AOL article by Vicki Salemi with a link below to the full article. The sentences in parentheses are my comments on some of the points. The doctor in Ms. Salemi’s article does recommend certain drugs as preventative measures; we, personally, prefer non-drug methods as much as possible, as all drugs have some negative side effects which can outweigh any benefits.

Vitamin B Work with your doctor to put together a plan to incorporate whatever vitamins you are deficient in, particularly Vitamin B. [Our doctor said that Vitamin B is the most difficult vitamin for the body to absorb, so he suggests a quality B complex even if it is the only vitamin you take.]

Heart Healthy Foods Implement a heart healthy diet that’s low in fat and high in fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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