Crisis Management – The Means to Long Life

March 19th, 2013

How you deal with crises or tragedies affect the length of your life as well as the daily quality.

I once heard a report on the news about a study done with people over 100 years of age.  They were expecting to discover a common health link, something those seniors did or did not eat, or some type of exercise routine.  Much to the astonishment of those doing the study, there did not appear to be any common denominators in health habits.  Obviously, health habits will affect the quality of one’s physical life, especially as you get older. However, the sole common denominator in these seniors who lived to be over 100 years of age was how they dealt with crises or tragedies;  they had a commitment to move forward or move past the tragedy and continue to find enjoyment in life. In their view, it was worth living just to be alive, regardless of the events they experienced.

A perspective that sees value solely in being alive will benefit one’s daily life as well.

Though it wasn’t discussed in the part of the report I heard, I would imagine that people who outlived their peers due to a commitment to move beyond tragedy had also lived their daily lives with the same perspective– ”This too shall pass,”  “Life goes on…,” or whatever applicable saying you have heard.  If one has a view to be able to enjoy life just because he or she is still alive, regardless of even facing tragedies, imagine how much less that type of person stresses over the typical daily struggles.  During those times in life when daily struggles start coming at you from every side Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Crisis Management – The Means to a Long Life

February 7th, 2013

How you deal with crises or tragedies affect the length of your life as well as the daily quality.

I once heard a report on the news about a study done with people over 100 years of age. They were expecting to discover a common health link, something those seniors did or did not eat, or some type of exercise routine. Much to the astonishment of those doing the study, there did not appear to be any common denominators in health habits. Obviously, health habits will affect the quality of one’s physical life, especially as you get older. However, the sole common denominator in these seniors who lived to be over 100 years of age was how they dealt with crises or tragedies; they had a commitment to move forward or move past the tragedy and continue to find enjoyment in life. In their view, it was worth living just to be alive, regardless of the events they experienced.

A perspective that sees value solely in being alive will benefit one’s daily life as well.

Though it wasn’t discussed in the part of the report I heard, I would imagine that people who outlived their peers due to a commitment to move beyond tragedy had also lived their daily lives with the same perspective-“This too shall pass,” “Life goes on…,” or whatever applicable saying you have heard. If one has a view to be able to enjoy life just because he or she is still alive, regardless of even facing tragedies, imagine how much less that type of person stresses over the typical daily struggles. During those times in life when daily struggles start Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Crisis Management – The Means to Long Life

September 17th, 2008

Reading Level: Leisurely

How you deal with crises or tragedies affect the length of your life as well as the daily quality.

I once heard a report on the news about a study done with people over 100 years of age. They were expecting to discover a common health link, something those seniors did or did not eat, or some type of exercise routine. Much to the astonishment of those doing the study, there did not appear to be any common denominators in health habits. Obviously, health habits will affect the quality of one’s physical life, especially as you get older. However, the sole common denominator in these seniors who lived to be over 100 years of age was how they dealt with crises or tragedies; they had a commitment to move forward or move past the tragedy and continue to find enjoyment in life. In their view, it was worth living just to be alive, regardless of the events they experienced.

A perspective that sees value solely in being alive will benefit one’s daily life as well.

Though it wasn’t discussed in the part of the report I heard, I would imagine that people who outlived their peers due to a commitment to move beyond tragedy had also lived their daily lives with the same perspective-“This too shall pass,” “Life goes on…,” or whatever applicable saying you have heard. If one has a view to be able to enjoy life just because he or she is still alive, regardless of even facing tragedies, imagine how much less Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Does God bring Harm and Tragedy?

May 16th, 2008

Reading Level: Leisurely

The week of this post there have been 2 major world tragedies, a cyclone in Burma and an earthquake in China. When tragedies occur, especially ones such as these that hit with such severity, there are always people who question if God is the source and others who insist on it. Though there could be a great deal of theological or doctrinal discussion on this point, I wanted to encourage you today with a main spiritual principle about the heart of God Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Does Harm Come to Teach Us Lessons? Part 2

March 7th, 2008

Table of contents for Does Harm Come

  1. Does Harm Come to Teach Us Lessons? Part 1 of 2
  2. Does Harm Come to Teach Us Lessons? Part 2

Reading Level: Gratifying

There is no doubt that extended illnesses, situations of extreme stress, and tragedies change us forever. Though we can become better people depending on how we handle them, that alone is not proof that God caused the hardships.

My parents were in a severe auto accident during the past year. The police officers and EMT’s at the scene, the doctor who operated on my mother, all told us that it was a horrible accident and that they should have been dead or completely paralyzed. We all were forced to grow in our faith and character by all the experiences we had never been through before. I grew weary of the well-meaning people who told my parents, “I hope you’ve learned what God wanted you to learn.”

There is a common illustration in Christendom which I refer to as the “broken leg heresy.” It is an enormous discredit to the nature and character of God.

Much of it stems from a book that someone wrote years ago comparing the nature of God to the habits of Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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Does Harm Come to Teach Us Lessons? Part 1 of 2

March 6th, 2008

Table of contents for Does Harm Come

  1. Does Harm Come to Teach Us Lessons? Part 1 of 2
  2. Does Harm Come to Teach Us Lessons? Part 2

Reading Level: Gratifying

Throughout my life, the majority of the religious people that I have encountered feel that any illness or hardship they suffer has come to them by the hand of God and has not been removed as a sort of lesson.

In recent studies on such topics over the past few years, I have come to some quite different conclusions than those of the religious majority. Such teaching does have a crippling effect on one’s faith. Let’s first look together at the following quote from the book, “Faith to Faith,” by Ken and Gloria Copeland, page dated Oct 18th.

“Is there actually a divine purpose behind the bad things that happen in your life? Could it be that the sicknesses and calamities you experience are somehow a part of God’s plan for you? Before you can ever begin to experience the healing, delivering power of God, you’ve got to…settle [those questions] once and for all. Immerse Yourself in the Full Healing Contemplation Here »

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